Despite a lull following the end of the Cold War, survivalism has gained greater attention in recent years, resulting in increased popularity of the survivalist lifestyle, as well as increased scrutiny. A National Geographic show interviewing survivalists, Doomsday Preppers, was a "ratings bonanza"[81] and "the network's most-watched series",[82] yet Neil Genzlinger in The New York Times declared it an "absurd excess on display and at what an easy target the prepper worldview is for ridicule," noting, "how offensively anti-life these shows are, full of contempt for humankind."[83]
Border Wars (2010–15) Breakout (2010–13) Python Hunters (2010–11) Fish Warrior (2010–11) Great Migrations (2010) Aftermath (2010) Alaska Wing Men (2011–12) Hard Time (2011–13) Beast Hunter (2011) Rocket City Rednecks (2011–13) Brain Games (2011–16) Viking Apocalypse (2011) Doomsday Preppers (2012–14) American Weed (2012) Comic Store Heroes (2012) American Gypsies (2012) Abandoned (2012) Evacuate Earth (2012–14) Access 360° World Heritage (2012–15) Are You Tougher Than a Boy Scout? (2013) The Numbers Game (2013) Polygamy, USA (2013) Ultimate Survival Alaska (2013–15) Street Genius (2013–15) Doomsday Castle (2013) Ultimate Airport Dubai (2013–15) Nazi Megastructures (2013) The Legend of Mick Dodge (2014) Duck Quacks Don't Echo (2014) Building Wild (2014–15) Filthy Riches (2014) Going Deep with David Rees (2014) Survive the Tribe (2014–16) Eat: The Story of Food (2014) Crowd Control (2014) Arrepentidos (2014) Underworld, Inc. (2015–16) Remote Survival (2015) The Big Picture with Kal Penn (2015) American Genius (2015) Yukon River Run (2015) China From Above (2015) Breakthrough (2015–16) Saints & Strangers (2015) Asombrosamente (2015) Supercar Megabuild (2016–17) Facing (2016) Years of Living Dangerously (2016) Origins: The Journey of Humankind (2017) The Long Road Home (2017)
In the previous decade, preparedness consultant, survival bookseller, and California-based author Don Stephens popularized the term retreater to describe those in the movement, referring to preparations to leave cities for remote havens or survival retreats should society break down. In 1976, before moving to the Inland Northwest, he and his wife authored and published The Survivor's Primer & Up-dated Retreater's Bibliography.

Life can change in a moment—do you have the survival gear you need to weather a disaster scenario? Uncharted Supply Co. offers the best survival gear available, including an array of must-have emergency supplies you won’t find at your run-of-the-mill survival store. Browse emergency equipment and arm yourself with survival gear that can help you stand up to even the most disastrous situations.

In my lectures on survival topics I often mention that there is just a thin veneer of civilization on our society. What is underneath is not pretty, and it does take much to peel away that veneer. You take your average urbanite or suburbanite and get him excessively cold, wet, tired, hungry and/or thirsty and take away his television, beer, drugs, and other pacifiers, and you will soon seen the savage within. It is like peeling the skin of an onion—remove a couple of layers and it gets very smelly. As a Christian, I attribute this to man’s inherently sinful nature.
This group consists of people who live in tornado, hurricane, flood, wildfire, earthquake or heavy snowfall-prone areas and want to be prepared for possible emergencies.[34] They invest in material for fortifying structures and tools for rebuilding and constructing temporary shelters. While assuming the long-term continuity of society, some may have invested in a custom-built shelter, food, water, medicine, and enough supplies to get by until contact with the rest of the world resumes following a natural emergency.[31]
The SEVENTY2 survival system from Uncharted Supply Co. offers everything you need to survive the first 72 hours of a disaster scenario. This survival kit is complete with 35 high-quality survival tools, including fire starters, a water filtration system, First Aid items, calorie-dense rations, and navigation tools—and that’s only the beginning. Trusted experts have collected only the most necessary tools to ensure you have everything you need to survive—and nothing you don’t. Don’t get weighed down with arbitrary survival gear; with the SEVENTY2 in hand, you can have peace of mind that you’re prepared for anything.

CRKT Knives and Karen Hood of Survival.com and Survival Quarterly Magazine are proud to announce the newest in the CRKT line of wilderness survival knives, the HoodWork™ and the HCK1™. While the phrase “Survival…it’s all in your head” is an intrinsic part of everything Karen Hood, Survival.com and Survival Quarterly Magazine, a good knife can also mean the difference between life and death in an extreme situation.
Many books were published in the wake of the Great Recession from 2008 and later offering survival advice for various potential disasters, ranging from an energy shortage and crash to nuclear or biological terrorism. In addition to the 1970s-era books, blogs and Internet forums are popular ways of disseminating survivalism information. Online survival websites and blogs discuss survival vehicles, survival retreats, emerging threats, and list survivalist groups.
About a month after I left meetup 2.0 at Pizza Hut, former attendee Garland Fitzhugh called to tell me it’s become more of an ‘eat-up’ than a prepper meetup—fair, considering there’s been no local calamity to keep the survivalist group on its toes. Allen emails meeting suggestions to a prepper listserv, asking them to focus on prepping situations they can actually influence. He may as well type in Wingdings. A former Navy technician, Allen spent most of the meeting on his phone; his ears only perk up when Andrew: says something about naval intelligence that piques his interest. “I try not to do that too much,” he tells me later. 
Pense just sold his company, Gardening Revolution. For 20 years he shipped the proprietary iron, zinc, manganese, copper, sulfur and boron soil blend. Each bed costs $800, after you buy the cinder blocks and mat. On his best year, he shipped $580,000-worth of them. The magazine John Deere Homestead featured him. He’s taught classes on raised-bed gardening and survival in his cabin ever since. “The record on tomatoes is 274 pounds for one plant. Think about that,” Pense says. “That’s a lot of ’maters for one plant.” More than the ’maters, he’s proud of teaching people younger than him to grow their own food. 
The helicopter eased down onto a lawn beside a putting green. The new luxury community will have three thousand acres of dunes and forestland, and seven miles of coastline, for just a hundred and twenty-five homes. As we toured the site in a Land Rover, he emphasized the seclusion: “From the outside, you won’t see anything. That’s better for the public and better for us, for privacy.”
This group consists of people who live in tornado, hurricane, flood, wildfire, earthquake or heavy snowfall-prone areas and want to be prepared for possible emergencies.[34] They invest in material for fortifying structures and tools for rebuilding and constructing temporary shelters. While assuming the long-term continuity of society, some may have invested in a custom-built shelter, food, water, medicine, and enough supplies to get by until contact with the rest of the world resumes following a natural emergency.[31]
At seventy-seven, living on a tugboat in Sausalito, Brand is less impressed by signs of fragility than by examples of resilience. In the past decade, the world survived, without violence, the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression; Ebola, without cataclysm; and, in Japan, a tsunami and nuclear meltdown, after which the country has persevered. He sees risks in escapism. As Americans withdraw into smaller circles of experience, we jeopardize the “larger circle of empathy,” he said, the search for solutions to shared problems. “The easy question is, How do I protect me and mine? The more interesting question is, What if civilization actually manages continuity as well as it has managed it for the past few centuries? What do we do if it just keeps on chugging?”
Reverse depends: AdjBQR, AER, AF, ahaz, AHR, AIM, anoint, APtools, attribrisk, Ball, BART, bayesDP, BayesMixSurv, bayesSurv, bhm, biostat3, BivarP, BMA, bshazard, carcass, cchs, cmprsk, coin, compound.Cox, cond, CoxBoost, coxed, coxinterval, coxme, CoxPhLb, coxphSGD, coxphw, CoxRidge, coxrobust, CPE, cr17, crossmatch, crrp, crrSC, csampling, ctqr, currentSurvival, distcomp, drgee, dynamichazard, dynfrail, DynNom, dynpred, eha, epiDisplay, epiR, FamEvent, fitdistrplus, flexPM, flexrsurv, flexsurv, flexsurvcure, frailtyEM, frailtyHL, frailtypack, frailtySurv, gamlss.cens, gamlss.nl, gcerisk, geecure, geneSignatureFinder, glmpath, globalboosttest, glrt, goftte, GORCure, greyzoneSurv, GSAgm, GSED, gte, gtx, HapEstXXR, HCmodelSets, Hmisc, iBST, ICBayes, icenReg, icensBKL, ICGOR, idmTPreg, IDPSurvival, imputeYn, InferenceSMR, InformativeCensoring, interval, invGauss, ipflasso, IPWsurvival, isoph, JM, JMbayes, joineR, joineRmeta, joineRML, joint.Cox, JointModel, JSM, kaps, kin.cohort, km.ci, kmconfband, lava.tobit, lcmm, LCox, linERR, LncMod, LogicReg, luca, MapGAM, marg, mexhaz, mfp, mhurdle, MiRKAT, missDeaths, mixor, mma, mmabig, mmc, MMMS, MPLikelihoodWB, MRH, mRMRe, MRsurv, MST, mstate, multcomp, multipleNCC, multistate, NADA, NestedCohort, nlreg, NPHMC, nricens, NSM3, optmatch, OrdFacReg, ordinalgmifs, OTRselect, OutlierDC, p3state.msm, packHV, paf, pamr, parfm, partDSA, pch, penalized, PenCoxFrail, peperr, permGPU, permGS, PHeval, PIGE, plac, plRasch, PRIMsrc, prognosticROC, PwrGSD, qrcm, qrcmNP, QualInt, RcmdrPlugin.coin, RcmdrPlugin.survival, relsurv, risksetROC, rms, RobustAFT, ROC632, ROCt, RPCLR, rprev, rstpm2, season, seawaveQ, selectiveInference, SemiCompRisks, seqDesign, seqMeta, SIMMS, simMSM, smcure, smoothHR, smoothSurv, SNPassoc, sp23design, speff2trial, SPREDA, sprinter, sptm, ssym, STAND, STAR, stepp, SubgrpID, superpc, surrosurvROC, survAccuracyMeasures, survAUC, survBootOutliers, survC1, survexp.fr, survey, Survgini, survIDINRI, survivalMPL, survivalsvm, survJamda, survMisc, SurvRegCensCov, survRM2, survSNP, SurvTrunc, tdROC, TH.data, threg, thregI, time2event, timereg, tnet, TransModel, uniah, uniCox, winRatioAnalysis, WPC, Zelig
×