In private Facebook groups, wealthy survivalists swap tips on gas masks, bunkers, and locations safe from the effects of climate change. One member, the head of an investment firm, told me, “I keep a helicopter gassed up all the time, and I have an underground bunker with an air-filtration system.” He said that his preparations probably put him at the “extreme” end among his peers. But he added, “A lot of my friends do the guns and the motorcycles and the gold coins. That’s not too rare anymore.”
Every year since 1947, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, a magazine founded by members of the Manhattan Project, has gathered a group of Nobel laureates and other luminaries to update the Doomsday Clock, a symbolic gauge of our risk of wrecking civilization. In 1991, as the Cold War was ending, the scientists set the clock to its safest point ever—seventeen minutes to “midnight.”
It’s bad enough being injured or lost in the wild but things really get bad when the weather closes in and you can’t get a fire started to stay warm and prepare food and hot drinks. That’s where Ultimate Survival Technologies’ Wetfire Tinder comes in. Developed specifically to help you get a fire going in the pouring rain if necessary it’s without a doubt essential survival gear.
SurvivalBlog’s editors are pleased to introduce a new classified ad service, designed specifically for individual preppers to list your personally-owned items and artisan skills/tools for exchange, sale, or as wanted. These classified ads are a way for the prepper community to reach other preppers with items that are valued by our community. Whether no longer needed because of an upgrade or excess supply or if created craftsmen/artisan pieces produced on the homestead, items can be listed by individuals for just $5 for 30 days.

The only shortage is diminutive size of the primary blade. Other than that it rates inclusion in any serious gear collection just by virtue of the plethora of options it presents you with and the quality of its construction. The handles on the OHT (One Hand Tool) display a graphic of the tool folded in beneath them so you don’t have to waste time guessing in survival situations. And the entire device is designed specifically to be operated with one hand, which in some survival situations is all you have to spare. A great piece of survival gear you shouldn’t be without.
Hall, in his late fifties, is barrel-chested and talkative. He studied business and computers at the Florida Institute of Technology and went on to specialize in networks and data centers for Northrop Grumman, Harris Corporation, and other defense contractors. He now goes back and forth between the Kansas silo and a home in the Denver suburbs, where his wife, a paralegal, lives with their twelve-year-old son.
Reverse imports: addhazard, aftgee, AICcmodavg, AIM, amt, bamlss, BayesCTDesign, baytrends, beanz, BeSS, BGPhazard, bhrcr, binequality, Biograph, BootValidation, BSGW, c060, cancerGI, carSurv, casebase, CaseBasedReasoning, CatPredi, censCov, CFC, cg, chngpt, CIEE, ciTools, clespr, cmprskQR, compareGroups, concreg, condSURV, controlTest, CoRpower, Counterfactual, coxphf, coxphMIC, coxrt, CP, CPsurv, CsChange, CutpointsOEHR, Cyclops, DDPGPSurv, DelayedEffect.Design, DPpackage, DStree, DTR, DWreg, dynsurv, EGRET, EL2Surv, ELYP, EMA, ePCR, Epi, epitab, epoc, etm, factorMerger, FHtest, finalfit, fmrs, fragilityindex, gamlss, gbm, ggquickeda, ggRandomForests, GJRM, glmBfp, gravity, greport, gyriq, hdnom, hds, hoa, hrIPW, ICcalib, idem, ilc, imsig, intercure, ipred, ipw, jomo, KMgene, kmi, landest, landpred, lava, lodGWAS, longROC, LTRCtrees, MachineShop, MAGNAMWAR, maxadjAUC, mboost, mccmeiv, Mediana, merlin, mets, mice, miCoPTCM, MIICD, mixPHM, mixtools, mlr, mlt, model4you, mombf, momentuHMM, moonBook, mpr, msaenet, msm, msmtools, mudens, muhaz, multistateutils, MXM, My.stepwise, nima, NNMIS, nparsurv, NPHazardRate, nsROC, numKM, obliqueRSF, OptimalTiming, orthoDr, pact, palasso, PAmeasures, party, partykit, pbatR, PDN, pec, permDep, personalized, Phase123, Plasmode, plsRcox, popEpi, powerSurvEpi, pre, prioritylasso, prodlim, pseval, PTE, pubh, Publish, PWEALL, quickReg, rankhazard, RcmdrPlugin.KMggplot2, rcure, regplot, ReIns, reportRx, reReg, rERR, riskRegression, RItools, rld, robustloggamma, ROlogit, rolr, rpsftm, rpst, rstanarm, Rsurrogate, RVFam, SCCS, scRNAtools, SEERaBomb, sensitivityPStrat, sglg, shrink, SIDES, simexaft, SimHaz, simPH, SIS, skpr, smcfcs, SMPracticals, spatsurv, spBayesSurv, spef, SSRMST, StatCharrms, stdReg, stpm, strataG, SubgrPlots, SUMMER, Sunclarco, Surrogate, SurrogateTest, surv2sampleComp, survAWKMT2, SurvCorr, SurvDisc, survidm, survivalAnalysis, survivALL, survminer, survRM2adapt, survsup, survutils, survxai, SvyNom, tab, TBSSurvival, TimeVTree, tram, TraMineRextras, TreatmentSelection, TSDT, TwoPhaseInd, TwoStepCLogit, uwIntroStats, valorate, VarReg, vennLasso, vpc, VRPM, WCE, weibulltools, WGCNA, WLreg, WRTDStidal, xpose4
Mainstream economist and financial adviser Barton Biggs is a proponent of preparedness. In his 2008 book Wealth, War and Wisdom, Biggs has a gloomy outlook for the economic future, and suggests that investors take survivalist measures. In the book, Biggs recommends that his readers should "assume the possibility of a breakdown of the civilized infrastructure." He goes so far as to recommend setting up survival retreats:[53] "Your safe haven must be self-sufficient and capable of growing some kind of food," Mr. Biggs writes. "It should be well-stocked with seed, fertilizer, canned food, medicine, clothes, etc. Think Swiss Family Robinson. Even in America and Europe, there could be moments of riot and rebellion when law and order temporarily completely breaks down."[23]
Adherents of the back-to-the-land movement inspired by Helen and Scott Nearing, sporadically popular in the United States in the 1930s and 1970s (exemplified by The Mother Earth News magazine), share many of the same interests in self-sufficiency and preparedness. Back-to-the-landers differ from most survivalists in that they have a greater interest in ecology and counterculture. Despite these differences, The Mother Earth News was widely read by survivalists as well as back-to-the-landers during that magazine's early years, and there was some overlap between the two movements.

Other newsletters and books followed in the wake of Ruff's first publication. In 1975, Kurt Saxon began publishing a monthly tabloid-size newsletter called The Survivor, which combined Saxon's editorials with reprints of 19th century and early 20th century writings on various pioneer skills and old technologies. Kurt Saxon used the term survivalist to describe the movement, and he claims to have coined the term.[9]

A quality hatchet can be a true lifesaver when it comes to building shelters and processing firewood in a wilderness survival setting. And it’s darn handy when you’re just camping in the local woods, too. Designed by Vietnam veteran Elmer Roush, the new CRKT Pack Axe is a tiny titan. Tipping the scales at a bantam weight of only 1.14 pounds, and less than a foot long, even the gram-conscious minimalists have to take notice. This beautifully built camp axe is made with 1060 carbon steel that is hot forged into very durable blade. It also has the bonus of a hammer poll (for pounding in stakes and such). Tennessee hickory is the wood of choice used for the hatchet handle, and it comes lacquer coated for a longer lifespan. If you’re looking for small axe that can tackle big jobs, check this one out. But don’t freak out when it arrives: it does not come with a sheath. You’ll have to provide your own. After all, it’s Columbia River Knife and Tool (CRKT), not Columbia River Knife and Tool and Leather Works (CRKTLW). I’m sure you needed to practice your leather work anyway. It should also be known that 10 percent of the profits on this tool go to the Green Beret Foundation. Way to go, CRKT!
And what better place to prepare than the Ozarks? Strafford got 47 inches of rain last year; the mean temperature was a mild 59 degrees. The Springfield Plateau has a 200-foot-deep aquifer for when rainwater gets scarce. The region is largely insulated from natural disasters—save the odd tornado or benign rumbling from the Bootheel’s New Madrid Fault Line—and the low population density of like-minded folks means preppers, survivalists and homesteaders get left alone. A Lebanon real estate agent tells me remote acreage is an increasingly hot commodity for city dwellers eager to go native. Conversations with locals and time spent on survivalism forums reveal a religious cohort who believe the Ozarks are God’s country—sacred ground upon which one can wage a last stand against the sins of a rapidly globalizing world.

As Huffman, of Reddit, observed, our technologies have made us more alert to risk, but have also made us more panicky; they facilitate the tribal temptation to cocoon, to seclude ourselves from opponents, and to fortify ourselves against our fears, instead of attacking the sources of them. Justin Kan, the technology investor who had made a halfhearted effort to stock up on food, recalled a recent phone call from a friend at a hedge fund. “He was telling me we should buy land in New Zealand as a backup. He’s, like, ‘What’s the percentage chance that Trump is actually a fascist dictator? Maybe it’s low, but the expected value of having an escape hatch is pretty high.’ ”
Before fire season, move combustibles away from your house. Fences and dry vegetation give fires a place to grow, says Jonathan Cox at Cal Fire, California’s Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Hosing down your house won’t help much, either, he says: “The way a lot of these homes burn is through something called ember cast, when embers from the fire fly over and drop little fires everywhere. With a huge ember cast, hosing down your house doesn’t do much.”
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